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Melanie Martinez - Toxic (originally by Britney Spears)
2,581,403 plays

kaldurrr:

when your friend gives you sad headcanons and you’re like “i’m calling the police”

kirschtein-relatable:

cedrikaprovencher:

landorus:

i feel like ‘restaurant’ shouldnt be spelled like that

les anglophones volent des mots à d’autres langues puis chialent parce qu’ils ne sont pas orthographiés comme ils le voudraient

IM GONNA REBLOG THIS POST UNTIL I DIE IM CRYING 

boo-author:

eshusplayground:

actualgothicheroine:

eshusplayground:

This makes me think about how the simple composition of a frame or shot can make a female character or character of color seem more or less important to a scene or narrative.

And I think this really drives home the point that there is a difference between viewing fiction as a window to another reality vs. a constructed story with meaning.

So many times I’ve seen what I story was trying to tell me about it’s characters, their roles, and their relationships. But the question you’re posing is one that I never thought to pose regularly when I view stories, how does the visual aspects of storytelling contribute to how the narrative and audience views a female character or person of color?

One thing I that’s very apparent is objectification. So,so many times, a female character will be introduced via the camera looking them up and down long before focusing on the face. We’re so used to things like that, it’s jarring when the same is done to a man, like the scene when Thranduil is introduced in The Hobbit.

One other thing we know as very apparent is when characters of color are placed in the background or off-center in group shots, leaving the white characters front and center.

Exactly. It’d be interesting just to go through a few movies or TV shows and examine their visual composition and see how that lines up.

This is colliding with a lot of thoughts I’ve been having lately vs. the idea of TV shows/movies as “this is what happened” vs. “this is the story of what happened”.

And also how protective the traditional Curators of Canon are against the more critical analysis and expansive views taken by (primarily female) fandom.

makanidotdot:

ep 3 doodles

i just wanna draw tiny snarky lil tophs forever and ever she is so freaking perfect

drew this one back in book 3, posting because relevance

image

image

pastel-cutie:

same

falloutgirlongirl:

spaceexp:

Your shadow is a confirmation that light has traveled nearly 93 million miles unobstructed, only to be deprived of reaching the ground in the final few feet thanks to you.

yeah but it had the privilege of reaching me

herpderpdurr:

Bury me I’m dead

herpderpdurr:

Bury me I’m dead

jorts420:

like this post if u are queer and tired, reblog if u are queer and tired x10

madragingven:

happy update fuckers here’s some fanart

madragingven:

happy update fuckers here’s some fanart

theheatofthesouth:

Suddenly you’re 21 and you’re screaming along in your car to all the songs you used to listen to when you were sad in middle school and everything is different but everything is good

kiyulking:

poppypicklesticks:

iwannalaughallyourtearsaway:

It’s Okay It’s Love(2014)

This drama is tragically and beautifully written. We rarely see the deglamorized reality of Mental Illness and the stigmas that come with it. I would highly suggest this drama to everyone! You don’t even have to be a drama fan to appreciate this amazingly well written story.

In some east Asian countries, mental illness carries even more of a stigma then it does in the UK and the US, which makes this film so much more important.

Ok I cried this drama needs so much more attention 

  1. The two male leads both suffer from mental illnesses
  2. The male lead has very severe schizophrenia
  3. He also has PTSD and can only sleep in his bathtub
  4. His friend (the second male) has Tourette’s which is consistently portrayed 
  5. They DO NOT HOLD BACK on the ableist statements and remarks posed to the characters at all
  6. Nearing the end of the drama the male lead completely loses his grasp on reality with a severe relapse 
  7. Neither character gets miraculously 100% cured (both are indicated to still take medication) 
  8. They make peace with their illnesses and it’s a happy ending

The drama’s writers were also recently given a plaque for their efforts in raising awareness for this, and it breaks the stereotype of the conventional ‘perfect family’ K-drama. Seriously, go watch this.